Hungarian Restaurant

Hungarian restaurant

The best and most authentic Hungarian restaurant Nagy Hussar.

Hungarian restaurant - The best and most authentic Hungarian restaurant Nagy Hussar.

The Gay Hussar in Soho, London is an old Hungarian restaurant.

Decor of the place is interesting; walls are covered with books They server hungarian food and of course hungarian wine, including sweet white Tokaji wine.

Food of the place is rather interesting, since it’s a mixture of Balkan and Eastern European cusine.

Pricelevel is rather high compared to style of the place and food quality.

Food is really good, tho.

http://hungarianrestaurant.net

Reviews and related sites

Gay Hussar - Traditional Hungarian restaurant Soho, London

The Gay Hussar, 2 Greek Street, London W1 | The Independent

Review analysis
location   food   staff  

Ever since it opened in 1953, the fate of The Gay Hussar has been intimately bound up with that of Britain's intellectual class, peaking in 1980 with the election of the late Michael Foot as Labour leader.

During the war, he served with British intelligence in Hungary, then opened a second Budapest on Frith Street before finally unveiling The Gay Hussar.

However, it was the restaurant's discovery by the firebrand Welsh MP Aneurin Bevan that led to it becoming the unofficial headquarters of Labour's intellectual left.

I start with the restaurant's famous chilled wild-cherry soup, while Caroline opts for the fried mushrooms with tartare sauce and Charlie has the fresh asparagus and bacon salad.

Scores: 1-9 stay home and cook, 10-11 needs help, 12 ok, 13 pleasant enough, 14 good, 15 very good, 16 capable of greatness, 17 special, can't wait to go back, 18 highly honourable, 19 unique and memorable, 20 as good as it gets The Gay Hussar 2 Greek Street, London W1, tel: 020 7437 0973 Lunch and dinner, Monday to Saturday.

The Rosemary organic Hungarian restaurant

Review analysis
food  

Welcome to the Rosemary We are a new Organic Hungarian café restaurant in New Cross Gate.

We pride ourselves on supplying the highest quality organic food at affordable prices.

Our meals and snacks are freshly made from the finest organic ingredients sourced from our own Certified Organic Farm in Welling and Keats Organics as well as number of other organic businesses.

We work closely with the No.178 Toucan Employment project as well as a number of other local organisations including Grow Wild, New Cross Learning and local schools to empower the community through nutrition and healthy living.

To make a booking or talk to us about possible events or community projects fill in the form below.

Menu - The Rosemary organic Hungarian restaurant

The Gay Hussar - Wikipedia

The Gay Hussar is a celebrated Hungarian restaurant located at 2 Greek Street, Soho, central London, England.

Victor Sassie[1] was the founder of The Gay Hussar restaurant in 1953.

Sassie was sent to Budapest in Hungary by the British Hotel and Restaurant Association when he was seventeen.

On his return to London in 1940, he established first the Budapest restaurant and then The Gay Hussar, which was to become popular with left wing politicians.

[3] The restaurant was named in honour of the elite Hussars of the Hungarian army.

The Gay Hussar, 2 Greek Street, London W1 | The Independent

Review analysis
location   food   staff  

Ever since it opened in 1953, the fate of The Gay Hussar has been intimately bound up with that of Britain's intellectual class, peaking in 1980 with the election of the late Michael Foot as Labour leader.

During the war, he served with British intelligence in Hungary, then opened a second Budapest on Frith Street before finally unveiling The Gay Hussar.

However, it was the restaurant's discovery by the firebrand Welsh MP Aneurin Bevan that led to it becoming the unofficial headquarters of Labour's intellectual left.

I start with the restaurant's famous chilled wild-cherry soup, while Caroline opts for the fried mushrooms with tartare sauce and Charlie has the fresh asparagus and bacon salad.

Scores: 1-9 stay home and cook, 10-11 needs help, 12 ok, 13 pleasant enough, 14 good, 15 very good, 16 capable of greatness, 17 special, can't wait to go back, 18 highly honourable, 19 unique and memorable, 20 as good as it gets The Gay Hussar 2 Greek Street, London W1, tel: 020 7437 0973 Lunch and dinner, Monday to Saturday.

Grace Dent reviews Gay Hussar | London Evening Standard

Review analysis
food  

ES Food Newsletter For reasons involving sentimentality and schadenfreude, the editor dispatched me this week to Hungarian stalwart the Gay Hussar on Greek Street, to document its final days.

And obviously, at one point, the Gay Hussar was de rigueur, but now it is the opposite and, sadly, a restaurant can’t pay its bills with the love of folk who think it’s really charming that it hasn’t been turned into a Starbucks yet, but never want to eat cumbersome plates of veal goulash beside a dusty library of political biographies.

The Gay Hussar could be a gorgeous, battily mad, imperfect yet raffish feeding and watering hole, steeped in history and juicy anecdotes, evoking the sense whenever one pops in — for a bowl of fish dumplings in dill sauce and a large apricot brandy — that London survives and we’re just ridiculous cameo characters passing through.

But presently, let’s not kid anyone, the Gay Hussar needs investment, a big yellow skip placed outside and a high-octane declutter and its entire menu scrapped, refocused and made appetising.

At the Gay Hussar £18 will buy you a plate of smoked goose with red cabbage and solet (Hungarian bean stew).

Can the conservatives save the Gay Hussar, Labour's canteen ...

Review analysis
food   menu   staff   value  

A month after their election victory three years ago, Patrick McLoughlin, then the party’s chief whip, assembled the entire whips’ office and headed to the Gay Hussar.

Since it opened in 1953, this cosy Hungarian restaurant on Greek Street in Soho has been known as Labour’s canteen.

Regular diners are concerned a new owner may not respect the restaurant’s heritage.

“It is a good deal less Hungarian than any restaurant I have been to in Hungary,” says Brian Sewell, the art critic and a regular diner for the past 40 years.

“There was a crisis when he became leader because people thought the Gay Hussar was a bit Old Labour,” says Dan Hodges, The Daily Telegraph columnist.